Best Films Directed By Women At The DFF

While women make up half the population, they’re currently only responsible for directing a fraction of films. There are, of course, numerous reasons for this. More importantly, though, is that we begin to recognize the importance of women in film.

The Denver Film Festival does its part year-round with their Women+Film partnership, through which they bring works by women to the big screen. Denver.com understands how important it is to elevate the stories told by women as well, so we’ve compiled some of the best films being exhibited at the 40th Denver Film Festival that were directed by women.

32 Pills: My Sister’s Suicide

32 Pills DFF
Photo courtesy of Denver Film Society

 

How can anyone make sense of suicide? That’s what director Hope Litoff sets out to do in this heart-wrenching documentary about the death of her sister, Ruth, by suicide. Ruth was a talented and driven artist, but she struggled with mental health issues for years. In her film, Litoff struggles to figure out the reasons while also detailing her own distress through the process.

Showtimes: Wednesday, November 8, at 6:45 p.m., Thursday, November 9, at 9:30 p.m. All screenings will be at the UA Denver Pavilions, located at 500 16th Street, on the third floor. For ticket information, click here.

Summer 1993

Summer DFF
Photo courtesy of Denver Film Society

Director Carla Simón shows her chops in this Spanish coming-of-age film—her first ever feature. The story follows Frida, a six-year-old girl who’s been recently orphaned and sent to live in the Spanish countryside with her uncle, aunt, and cousin, as she navigates her new life without her parents. It’s a film that can be equal parts heart-wrenching and heartwarming.

Showtimes: Friday, November 10, at 4:30 p.m., Saturday, November 11, at 11:30 a.m., Sunday, November 12, at 11:00 a.m. All screenings will be at the UA Denver Pavilions. For ticket information, click here.

Never Steady, Never Still

Never Steady DFF
Photo courtesy of Denver Film Society

 

Writer-director Kathleen Hepburn takes viewers on a difficult but important journey into the life of Judy, a woman living with Parkinson’s at the moment she loses her husband (who also happened to be her only caregiver). Throughout the film, we also meet Judy’s son, Jamie, who has his own personal battles to deal with regarding his work life and his sexuality. It’s a striking film about family and perseverance, and Hepburn never disappoints.

Showtimes: Thursday, November 9, at 6:45 p.m., Friday, November 10, at 4:00 a.m., Saturday, November 11, at 1:15 p.m. All screenings will be at the UA Denver Pavilions. For ticket information, click here.

Waiting for Hassana

Hassana DFF
Photo courtesy of Denver Film Society

This documentary short by director Ifunanya Maduka delves into just one story of the 276 teen girls kidnapped by Boko Haram in Chibok, Nigeria, back in 2014. The subject of the documentary tells how she was captured, how she escaped, and how she continues to hope for the return of her best friend, Hassana. It’s the first documentary about the Chibok Girls and has played in a number top film festivals, including SXSW and Sundance. It is being presented as part of the Shorts 2 series.

Showtimes: Wednesday, November 8, at 3:45 p.m., Thursday, November 9, at 6:30 p.m. All screenings will be at the UA Denver Pavilions. For ticket information, click here.